Less Frequent Cervical Cancer Screening Proposed

Less frequent testing for cervical cancer is recommended in 2 separate proposed guidelines.
1. One from the United States Preventative Services Task Force (USPTF), and 2. Other from the American Cancer Society (ACS); working in collaboration with the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP); and the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP).

Micrograph showing a high-grade squamous intra...

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Amplify’d from www.medscape.com
Proposed ACS/ASCCP/ASCP Guidelines

The proposed guidelines from the ACS/ASCCP/ASCP contain several changes from the existing guidelines, as outlined below, which will result in women undergoing fewer tests during their lifetime.

The changes include:

  • Instead of beginning screening 3 years after starting sexual intercourse, the new starting age will be 21 years. This applies equally to women who have and have not been vaccinated against HPV.
  • Pap testing (conventional or liquid based) is recommended every 3 years for women 21 to 29 years of age. This replaces the current recommendation for annual testing with a conventional Pap test or testing every 2 years with a liquid-based Pap test.
  • Pap testing is recommended every 3 years for women 30 years and older, although the preferred strategy is Pap testing plus HPV testing every 3 to 5 years.
  • It is recommended that women who have had normal results on 3 Pap tests in a row, or if over the past 10 years there have not been any abnormal Pap tests and 2 or more HPV tests have been negative, testing can be stopped at 65 instead of 70 years of age.

In addition, the draft ACS/ASCCP/ASCP document states that there is insufficient evidence to recommend for or against a comprehensive program for primary screening with HPV testing alone.

New Proposed USPSTF Guidelines

Similarly, the draft document from the USPSTF recommends:

  • no screening in women younger than 21 years of age, regardless of sexual history
  • screening with Pap tests every 3 years in women 21 to 65 years of age
  • no screening in women older than 65 years of age who have had adequate previous screening and who are not otherwise at high risk for cervical cancer.

Read more at www.medscape.com

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